thumbnail from dummy spread

DAY 1: Please tell me in what order you read the 3 individual "word bubbles"...


DAY 2: Hmmm... I've added 3 new versions below... I'd like the interactivity of having the reading turn the book, but not if it is a struggle... Hopefully some variation of one of the below will work... thoughts?

(above: simplified -- i hope)


(above: follow the swoopy words!)


(above: just like the preceding image but everything is flipped... so you would turn to this spread and suddenly we are upside-down. When the reader turns the page again, things are back to right-side-up)

6 comments:

June said...

I read it, top left, bottom right - which I think is supposed to be the last bubble, and then I wonder what the other text says so would turn it around to read it.
But that may be because I am looking at a screen (rather than a book) that I cannot rotate to read the upside down text, so leave that bit till last!

Could the weight or colour of the font help in ordering the text at all?

Connie M said...

Ditto what June said. Even with a book, I'm pretty sure I would read the two right-side-up bits before turning it to see what the other one said.

Consie said...

Andy - Like June, I read the upper left balloon, the the lower right balloon, and finally the upside down one. I think that even if I had the spread physically in hand, I would still be drawn to reading the two "right-side-up" balloons first. I think what you need to do here is look seriously at how these blocks of text work as part of the design, and not so much as text right now. What do you need to do to lead your viewer's eye where it needs to go? It's not going to work to have "only" the text be what is giving the reader the cue to turn the book. You've got a complex action that you want to happen here. Maybe size, or shape of the visual element is your key. Play around with some physical cutouts - move them around; stand back from them, reshape them. Maybe you don't want to do a full 180 on the first turn. Maybe a quarter turn would work, then another quarter turn, and then finally back to normal. I would suggest you also ask yourself why it is that you want the book to be turned over. As long as you have a good answer to that, then go for it. If you don't have a good answer, then figure out why.
Consie

Consie said...

Andy - that middle version is MUCH more engaging, and it gives a real feel for what you are having your character doing (slip all over the place). I think the third one doesn't work, as being upside down immediately is too jarring (altho starting your word trail farther to the left is not a problem). How about if you have it start rightsideup, like your middle one, and then as the reader follows that swoopy line of words, you could make it so that to read that line, you have to then actually turn the book. (As you have it now, the reader can do it without turning the book). This would be a good way to start normal, engage your reader in the physical act of turning the book, and have it also jive with what is happening in the story. In other words, you want topsy turvy, and you use your words to lead the reader's eye, so that the actual book has to have some topsy turvy too. I think you are definitely getting there! This is much more fun to look at than the earlier version.

June said...

The 3rd image with the 'swoopy words' seems to be heading in the right direction to me! Use the text to make the reader follow where you want them to go.
Interesting idea...

Connie M said...

I don't have an opinion about the book-turning idea, but I like version 2. The copy seems more interesting and actually easier to read in the swooping line than it is in a block.